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 What line is best for bass fishing
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wooddog
Intermediate Member

66 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2015 :  11:03:01 AM  Show Profile  Visit wooddog's Homepage Send wooddog a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm trying to get back into bass fishing, and I would like to know what is a good line to use and what lb test should I have. Trying to see what the pros are using. Thanks!

peteclat
Intermediate Member



75 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2015 :  11:29:50 AM  Show Profile Send peteclat a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I use 8 lb suffix, which is more than enough for pond fishing. For lake fishing I would move up to 20 lb spiderwire.
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Spoonmaster
Senior Member



752 Posts

Posted - 04/10/2015 :  9:22:05 PM  Show Profile Send Spoonmaster a Private Message  Reply with Quote
A lot depends on what type of lure you're fishing, water clarity, as well as what the cover is like where you are targeting your fish. I prefer fluorocarbon for my worms and crankbaits, except that I fish a floating worm on monofilament. Basically anything that floats I use mono and anything that sinks I use fluoro. Fluoro is also great for getting more bites when finnesse fishing in very clear water. It doesn't stretch as much as mono and is basically invisible in water, letting you fish heavier line and still get bit. If you are in heavy grass or pads braid is the only way to fly. Others may have better advice than me.

If you decide to try fluorocarbon learn the San Diego knot and, when starting out, go to a lighter action rod than you normally use. Fluoro doesn't stretch as much as mono. I broke 4 fish off setting the hook during my first day fishing with it. Also check the line closely for nicks when fishing in rocks or on shellbeds and retie as needed.
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jws
Senior Member



1160 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2015 :  2:15:17 PM  Show Profile Send jws a Private Message  Reply with Quote
14 to 20 lb Berkeley Trilene is all I use. Texas rig worm is about the only thing I throw on 20.
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mdl5155
Senior Member



342 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2015 :  9:55:54 PM  Show Profile Send mdl5155 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
total and complete agreement on spoonmaster's comments
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wooddog
Intermediate Member



66 Posts

Posted - 04/16/2015 :  10:11:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit wooddog's Homepage Send wooddog a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have 12lb suffix fluorocarbon on my line which is great except getting tangled sometimes, kind of like a backlash. I use spinning reel with a Yamamoto 6" Senko

Edited by - wooddog on 04/16/2015 2:25:53 PM
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bomber
Senior Member



174 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2016 :  8:24:38 PM  Show Profile Send bomber a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Always use Ande 15lb clear. Cast like a dream and reels like a dream.
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Spoonmaster
Senior Member



752 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2016 :  9:30:31 PM  Show Profile Send Spoonmaster a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wooddog, I fish, almost exclusively, high end baitcasting reels for bass fishing.
A little bit lighter line and/or a good ball bearing swivel might work better for you with a spinning reel. Especially if the areas you're fishing aren't full of heavy cover, stumps, etc. The ball bearing swivel will help eliminate line twist.
Or, you might try braided line with a ball bearing swivel and fluorocarbon leader. A lot stronger line, longer casting ability and more bites in clear water. Just be aware that the braid might require a special rod with guides made for braided line.

Edited by - Spoonmaster on 04/25/2016 9:33:34 PM
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bigjim5589
Senior Member



364 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2016 :  9:38:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit bigjim5589's Homepage Send bigjim5589 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I agree with Spoonmaster about the variables determining what's best. However, lines are like many other things we use, primarily personal choice as there are many good options, none of which is right or wrong. Most folks with extensive experience use more than one type for the various applications.

For me, I like braid (Sufix 832) for jigs & heavier subsurface use, ( Carolina or Texas rigs, flipping & pitching weedless baits, etc.) but also use a hybrid line for crankbaits & lighter presentations. Braid has no stretch & a high strength to diameter ratio. That means you get a very thin line which is very strong. I also like braid for surface frogs, the hollow type used on top of thicker cover. I'm not a fan of fluorocarbon, as the Hybrid line (Yozuri) I use does everything for me that fluoro might do & is a bit less costly. I'm also not convinced that fish seeing the line or not is of any importance. They know it's there, but don't react to it. I actually use hi vis yellow braid up to 65 lb test and tie direct to my lures, and I still catch plenty of fish. I'm 60 & can see the hi vis yellow best so it's my first choice. I'll use braid in other colors too, but mostly because they may be on sale.

With all this said what we each choose also has a lot to do with confidence in our choices. We can't really know what a bass will react to positively or negatively, but either way we have to be confident the gear we choose is right for us.

So, you see everyone has theories, opinions, and favorites when it comes to lines, just as with everything else in this sport. You have to choose based on how you wish to fish, and how much you're willing to spend (braid isn't cheap!) and how confident you are in your choices.

I used mono for many years (Berkley Big Game mostly, but also used Ande) for all applications because that's pretty much all that we had, and that worked fine. I've known some guys older than me who had used braided dacron lines for bass years ago and they caught plenty of fish. Technology has changed for the better with line, but doesn't mean fish won't be caught using just mono if you decide that's best for you. There are advantages & disadvantages to all lines.

Some certainly cast better than others on the various tackle types and that can be important too. I like what I've mentioned just as others like what they've mentioned. Boils down to personal choice, but you've got to start somewhere. You may want to try each type & see for yourself what you like best. You'll spend a bit more initially, but in the end it may save you for the long run.

Edited by - bigjim5589 on 04/25/2016 9:41:21 PM
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bomber
Senior Member



174 Posts

Posted - 04/25/2016 :  10:27:51 PM  Show Profile Send bomber a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Spoonmaster

Wooddog, I fish, almost exclusively, high end baitcasting reels for bass fishing.
A little bit lighter line and/or a good ball bearing swivel might work better for you with a spinning reel. Especially if the areas you're fishing aren't full of heavy cover, stumps, etc. The ball bearing swivel will help eliminate line twist.
Or, you might try braided line with a ball bearing swivel and fluorocarbon leader. A lot stronger line, longer casting ability and more bites in clear water. Just be aware that the braid might require a special rod with guides made for braided line.



I agree with this. The spinning rods cast lighter line much better. I bass fish with ambassator 5000 reels.
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