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Aus-Sea
Intermediate Member

99 Posts

Posted - 04/06/2019 :  10:01:37 AM  Show Profile  Send Aus-Sea a Yahoo! Message Send Aus-Sea a Private Message  Reply with Quote
After having a couple of 'experiences' in FMNF, I decided it was time to get my own land where I didn't have to worry about who else was out there and whether they could tell a deer from a greyhound bus.

Just picked up 50 acres in the Kingstree area. Not the greatest land (right now its more pond than land), but it's mine - and I want to try and make the best of it.

There is a timber deed on it that expires mid-next year, so I don't think I can do too much yet. Hoping that others on the forum may lend some ideas-from-experience in helping a first-time hunting land owner get started in the right direction.

[EDIT] I may be sounding a little vague. I DO have my ideas of what I want to do with the land (foodplots, fruit trees, shooting lanes, etc). Hoping someone has those 'I did this, but I should have done this first' insights that only come from actually doing it.


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Nothing but a bare spot on the lawn where the boat used to be

Edited by - Aus-Sea on 04/06/2019 10:28:11 AM

Partners-Ship
Senior Member



1565 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2019 :  10:51:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Partners-Ship's Homepage Send Partners-Ship a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Check prevailing wind direction and how you will get in and out of stands.
Something that I have not done that I am going to do this year is hinge cutting to force deer movement.

Hunting, fishing, and poker are my sports. Work when necessary.
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yakgotstuck
Intermediate Member



113 Posts

Posted - 04/08/2019 :  11:33:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit yakgotstuck's Homepage Send yakgotstuck a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I know next to nothing about wildlife/land management but I would love to hear updates on what you do with the property

Sam Elliott
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJapLk9rt91Jop89mxRU7eg?
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Fred67
Prolific Poster



13685 Posts

Posted - 04/09/2019 :  1:01:12 PM  Show Profile Send Fred67 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
cross your fingers and hope it stays to wet or they are not able to harvest timber.

Hardwood or pine? If hardwood look for oaks to sit by this fall. I would find out who adjacent land owners are and feel them out on what kind of hunting they do or do not do. Hopefully no dog hunters near by, if so to keep peace, good fences make good neighbors. I'd start simple until timber harvest is over, put out a bunch of game camera's and get a feel for what you have and where they like to travel/bed.

On the pond thing, maybe look into ditching property or digging a pond and us dirt for back fill in low areas. When the hunting is no good a nice landscaped and stocked pond sure is nice. Don't get in a rush! Rome wasn't built in a day!


Good Luck! Nothing like you own property to hunt!
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Flat Bottom
Senior Member



316 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2019 :  11:53:39 AM  Show Profile Send Flat Bottom a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ponds are agreat pinch point, with good bedding area near by and a food food plot or feeder. Sounds like a good starting place.

Post an areal photo.

Sabalo 21 150 Yamaha

Key West Stealth 150 V-max (SOLD)
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Great White
Senior Member



1246 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2019 :  5:55:33 PM  Show Profile Send Great White a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Start simple and work your way up. You have no idea if you are going to like this place or not so feel it out for a year.

Simple:
  • Cut shooting lanes
  • Ladder stands or build stands in trees
  • focusing on hunting trails, roads, fence lines, natural shooting lanes
  • once you feel it's safe to do so put cameras up
  • gravity feeders and corn (it may take the deer months to get used to these)
  • posted signs if you think they wont rub people the wrong way, aka taunt them into hunting your land
  • mineral blocks
  • LOCKED gates ALL ROADS in
  • Walk the land a lot so you are familiar with it


If your cameras don't disappear or catch neighbors on your land you probably found a decent place. Be prepared for people to tear down your posted signs and steal your cameras/stands if they find them.

After a season and you decide if the juice is worth the squeeze consider stepping it up
  • clear out shooting lanes and turn them into food plots (soil test, lime, fertilizer, seed, poison, plowing)
  • get automatic corn feeders
  • Build box stands
  • fertilize existing feed trees (oak, plum, crab apple)


You in it for the long hauls?
  • clearing land for larger food plots
  • controlled burning for forest management
  • planting feed trees (oak, fruit, etc)



I say start simple because there is A LOT that CAN be done but you will take your lumps along the way. You don't want to waste time and money planting trees if you find out your neighbor sucks and runs dogs through every week, or cameras constantly walk away, or you have major poaching problems forcing you to change places. Be careful doing some of this alone because some of these activities can gravely injure you. Not to burst your bubble but 50 acres is small. It won't feel private if you have a busy road nearby. It is very easy for somebody for somebody to walk in and out of a small piece of land like that without you noticing. If you are successful don't go bragging to your neighbors about all the big deer you kill as they can choke you out easily if they decide to start hunting your borders. Do NOT clear out good bedding habitat. An added challenge of having a small piece of land like that is keeping deer on your land which starts with good bedding areas.

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Great White
Senior Member



1246 Posts

Posted - 04/13/2019 :  5:55:34 PM  Show Profile Send Great White a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Start simple and work your way up. You have no idea if you are going to like this place or not so feel it out for a year.

Simple:
  • Cut shooting lanes
  • Ladder stands or build stands in trees
  • focusing on hunting trails, roads, fence lines, natural shooting lanes
  • once you feel it's safe to do so put cameras up
  • gravity feeders and corn (it may take the deer months to get used to these)
  • posted signs if you think they wont rub people the wrong way, aka taunt them into hunting your land
  • mineral blocks
  • LOCKED gates ALL ROADS in
  • Walk the land a lot so you are familiar with it


If your cameras don't disappear or catch neighbors on your land you probably found a decent place. Be prepared for people to tear down your posted signs and steal your cameras/stands if they find them.

After a season and you decide if the juice is worth the squeeze consider stepping it up
  • clear out shooting lanes and turn them into food plots (soil test, lime, fertilizer, seed, poison, plowing)
  • get automatic corn feeders
  • Build box stands
  • fertilize existing feed trees (oak, plum, crab apple)


You in it for the long hauls?
  • clearing land for larger food plots
  • controlled burning for forest management
  • planting feed trees (oak, fruit, etc)



I say start simple because there is A LOT that CAN be done but you will take your lumps along the way. You don't want to waste time and money planting trees if you find out your neighbor sucks and runs dogs through every week, or cameras constantly walk away, or you have major poaching problems forcing you to change places. Be careful doing some of this alone because some of these activities can gravely injure you. Not to burst your bubble but 50 acres is small. It won't feel private if you have a busy road nearby. It is very easy for somebody for somebody to walk in and out of a small piece of land like that without you noticing. If you are successful don't go bragging to your neighbors about all the big deer you kill as they can choke you out easily if they decide to start hunting your borders. Do NOT clear out good bedding habitat. An added challenge of having a small piece of land like that is keeping deer on your land which starts with good bedding areas.

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First, Most, Biggest
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Aus-Sea
Intermediate Member



99 Posts

Posted - 04/20/2019 :  10:06:40 AM  Show Profile  Send Aus-Sea a Yahoo! Message Send Aus-Sea a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks to all for sharing your experience.

Quite a few things here that I had not thought of but make complete sense once raised.

__________________________________________________

Nothing but a bare spot on the lawn where the boat used to be
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